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III.—Exercises at the Tree-Planting.




1. PLANTING OF TREES. (ONE OR MORE).

 

2. SONG.

PLANTING THE TREE.

music

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Gather we here to plant the fair tree;
Gladsome the hour, joyous and free,
Greeting to thee, fairest of May!
Breathe sweet the buds on our loved Arbor Day.
Gather we now, the sapling around,
Singing our song—let it resound:
Refrain.
Happy the day! Happy the hour!
Joyous we, all of us, feel their glad power.
Shovel and spade, trowel and hoe,
Carefully dig up the quick-yielding ground;
Make we a bed, softly lay low
Each little root with the earth spread around;
Snug as a nest, the soil round them pressed,
This is the home that the rootlings love best.
Refrain.
Moisten and soften the ground, ye Spring Rains;
Swell ye the buds, and fill ye the veins,
Bless the dear tree, bountiful Sun;
Warm thou the blood in the stem till it run;
Hasten the growth, let leaves have birth,
Make it most beautiful thing of the earth.
Refrain.

Dr. E.P. Waterbury

3. RECITATIONS.

NOTE.—One or more of the recitations may be given with the planting of each tree, the number depending upon the number of trees planted.

First pupil.

Plant in the spring-time the beautiful trees,
So that in future each soft summer breeze,
Whispering through tree-tops may call to our mind,
Days of our childhood then left far behind.
Days when we learned to be faithful and true;
Days when we yearned our life's future to view;
Days when the good seemed so easy to do;
Days when life's cares were so light and so few.

Second pupil.

Plant trees for beauty, for pleasure and for health;
Plant trees for shelter, for fruitage and for wealth.

Third pupil.

NOBILITY.

True worth is in being, not seeming,
In doing each day that goes by
Some little good—not in the dreaming
Of great things to do by and by.
Alice Cary.

Fourth pupil.

PLANTING OF TREES.

Oh, happy trees which we plant to-day,
What great good fortunes wait you!
For you will grow in sun and snow
Till fruit and flowers freight you.
Your winter covering of snow,
Will dazzle with its splendor;
Your summer's garb, with richest glow,
Will feast of beauty render.
In your cool shade will tired feet
Pause, weary, when 'tis summer,
And rest like this will be most sweet
To every tired new-comer.

Fifth pupil.

THE COMING OF SPRING.

When wake the violets, winter dies;
When sprout the elm buds, Spring is near;
When lilacs blossom, Summer cries,
Bud, little rose! Spring is here.

Lowell

Sixth Pupil.

When we plant a tree, we are doing what we can to make our planet a more wholesome and happier dwelling-place for those who come after us, if not for ourselves.

O.W. Holmes

Seventh pupil.

"It is no exaggerated praise to call a tree the grandest and most beautiful of all the productions of the earth."

Gilpin, Forest Scenery.

Eighth pupil.

"Kind hearts are the gardens,
Kind thoughts are the roots,
Kind words are the blossoms,
Kind deeds are the fruits."

Ninth pupil.

What do we plant when we plant the tree?
We plant the ship which will cross the sea.
We plant the mast to carry the sails;
We plant the planks to withstand the gales—
The keel, the keelson, and beam and knee;
We plant the ship when we plant the tree.

Tenth pupil.

What do we plant when we plant the tree?
We plant the houses for you and me.
We plant the rafters, the shingles, the floors,
We plant the studding, the lath, the doors,
The beams and siding, all parts that be;
We plant the house when we plant the tree.

Eleventh pupil.

What do we plant when we plant the tree?
A thousand things that we daily see;
We plant the spire that out-towers the crag,
We plant the staff for our country's flag,
We plant the shade, from the hot sun free;
We plant all these when we plant the tree.

Henry Abbey.

4. TREE PLANTING SONG.

PLANTING OF THE TREE.

music

J.D. Burrell

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5. PATRIOTIC RECITATION.

UNION AND LIBERTY.

First voice.
Flag of the heroes who left us their glory,
Borne through our battle-fields' thunder and flame,
Blazoned in song and illumined in story,
Wave o'er us all who inherit their fame!
Second voice.
Light of our firmament, guide of our nation,
Pride of her children, and honored afar,
Let the wide beams of thy full constellation
Scatter each cloud that would darken a star!
Third voice.
Empire unsceptred! what foe shall assail thee,
Bearing the standard of Liberty's van?
Think not the God of thy fathers shall fail thee,
Striving with men for the birthright of man!
Fourth voice.
Yet, if by madness and treachery blighted,
Dawns the dark hour when the sword thou must draw,
Then, with the arms of thy millions united,
Smite the bold traitors to Freedom and Law!
All.
Up with our banner bright,
Sprinkled with starry light,
Spread its fair emblems from mountain to shore;
While through the sounding sky,
Loud rings the Nation's cry,—
Union and Liberty!—one evermore!

Oliver Wendell Holmes

6. ADDRESS OR READING OF SOME SELECTION FROM ANOTHER PART OF THIS PAMPHLET.

7. MARCHING FROM THE FIELD. (TO FOLLOWING TUNE.)

WOODMAN, SPARE THAT TREE.

musicmusic

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8. BREAKING RANKS AND DISMISSAL.

 

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