Informational Site NetworkInformational Site Network
Privacy
 
Home - Origin of Arbor Day   Arbor Day Readings   Arbor Day Celebrations   Arbor Day Programs       Tree Species   Studies of Trees   New England Trees  

The Leopard Moth




Life history: This insect does its serious damage in the grub form. The

grubs which are whitish in color with brown heads, and which vary in

size from 3/8 of an inch to 3 inches in length (Fig. 104), may be

found boring in the wood of the branches and trunk of the tree all

winter. Fig. 105. The leopard moth requires two years to complete

its round of life. The mature moths are marked with dark spots

resembling a leopard's skin, hence the name. Fig. 106. It is one of

the commonest and most destructive insects in the East and is

responsible for the recent death of thousands of the famous elm

trees in New Haven and Boston. Fig. 107.






Remedies: Trees likely to be infested with this insect should be

examined three or four times a year for wilted twigs, dead branches,

and strings of expelled frass; all of which may indicate the

presence of this borer. Badly infested branches should be cut off

and burned. Trees so badly infested that treatment becomes too

complicated should be cut down and destroyed. Where the insects are

few and can be readily reached, an injection of carbon bisulphide

into the burrow, the orifice of which is then immediately closed

with soap or putty, will often destroy the insects within.







Tree Studies


How To Identify Trees
Group I The Pines
The White Pine (pinus Strobus)
The Pitch Pine (pinus Rigida)
The Scotch Pine (pinus Sylvestris)
Group Ii The Spruce And Hemlock
The Norway Spruce (picea Excelsa)
Hemlock (tsuga Canadensis)
Group Iii The Red Cedar And Arbor-vitae
Red Cedar (juniperus Virginiana)
Arbor-vitae; Northern White Cedar (thuja Occidentalis)
Group Iv The Larch And Cypress
The European Larch (larix Europaea)
Bald Cypress (taxodium Distichum)
Group V The Horsechestnut, Ash And Maple
The Horsechestnut
The White Ash (fraxinus Americana)
Sugar Maple (acer Saccharum)
Silver Maple (acer Saccharinum)
Red Maple (acer Rubrum)
Norway Maple (acer Platanoides)
Box Elder (acer Negundo)
Group Vi Trees Told By Their Form: Elm, Poplar, Gingko And Willow
American Elm (ulmus Americana)
Lombardy Or Italian Poplar (populus Nigra, Var Italica)
Gingko Or Maidenhair Tree (gingko Biloba)
Weeping Willow (salix Babylonica)
Group Vii Trees Told By Their Bark Or Trunk: Sycamore, Birch, Beech,
Blue Beech, Ironwood, And Hackberry
The Sycamore Or Plane Tree (platanus Occidentalis)
Gray Or White Birch (betula Populifolia)
American Beech (fagus Americana)
Blue Beech Or Hornbeam (carpinus Caroliniana)
Hackberry (celtis Occidentalis)
Group Viii The Oaks And Chestnut
White Oak (quercus Alba)
Black Oak (quercus Velutina)
Red Oak (quercus Rubra)
Pin Oak (quercus Palustris)
Chestnut (castanea Dentata)
Group Ix The Hickories, Walnut And Butternut
Shagbark Hickory (hicoria Ovata)
Mockernut Hickory (hicoria Alba)
Black Walnut (juglans Nigra)
Group X Tulip Tree, Sweet Gum, Linden, Magnolia, Locust, Catalpa,
Dogwood, Mulberry And Osage Orange
Tulip Tree (liriodendron Tulipifera)
Sweet Gum (liquidambar Styraciflua)
American Linden (tilia Americana)
The Magnolias